TBT 39 | Good Enough

 

Perfectionism is an obsession to work something to the end, to do one more thing, to overdo, to over function, to over-perform when it’s really not necessary and when it’s not adding any additional value. But how do we know when it’s good enough? In order to avoid perfection, we need to define ahead of time what’s good enough so that we don’t get caught up in perfection. We set those criteria so we can ask ourselves, “Have we reached good enough? Did we accomplish what we set out to do?” There are going to be a few errors but that’s okay. Learn the different strategies to help you to manage perfectionism so you can let go of perfection and find that as long as you did your best, if you know when you’re at 80%, it’s good enough.

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Let Go Of Perfection: Find Good Enough

We’re going to talk about perfectionism and how to let go of perfectionism, how to rid yourself of this perfectionism, this obsession, because that’s what perfectionism is. It’s an obsession to work something to the end, to do one more thing, to overdo, to over function, to overperform when it’s really not necessary when it’s not adding any additional value. I want to call this episode Good Enough. How do we know when it’s good enough? In order to avoid perfection, what we need to do is to be able to define ahead of time what’s good enough so that we don’t get caught up in perfection, so that we can ask ourselves, “Have we reached good enough?” We’ve set that criteria.

For instance, when I was writing my book, I had a deadline of the date that I was going to be releasing my book. In a way, that also said a good enough because wherever I was, I was going to publish it and it was going to be good enough because I publicized that that’s when it was going to be rolled out. Whatever effort I was going to put in was going to make that date good enough. Another thing to look at is what is that 80% solution. How would I know that it was good enough? I wrote down what it was that I wanted people to take away from the book while reading it. What kind of experience that I want them to have?

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I tell a story in the beginning and then I talk about the teaching points and then I sum it up in the end. If I feel like that the person took away the story and related it to their own lives and also took away those takeaways, then I felt like I did what I set out to do. That was good enough. I had a benchmark point to be able to reference to say, “Did I accomplish that?” There might have been some errors still left in. I had four or five editors go through and we went through it many times with different sets of eyes, but errors happen. The question I had to ask myself with those errors, “Were they big enough?” Even though I couldn’t find them. If they stood out, we already got it. Whatever errors might be there, whatever small spelling errors or duplication of words, are they going to be big enough to stop somebody from having the experience that I intended? If the answer is no and since we didn’t find them after so many eyes, I could say, “No. I did the best that we could within that timeframe to mitigate any errors.” I could accept that there were going to be a few errors in that and that’s okay.

TBT 39 | Good Enough

Good Enough: Manage perfectionism. Accept that there are going to be a few errors and that’s okay.

 

That’s what I want you to be thinking of is these different strategies to help you to manage perfectionism, if that’s something that you might have a tendency to do like I do. Take a look and put these things in place to support yourself so that you know when you’re there. You know when you’re at 80%. You can look back and you can also see, “Did I follow the steps in the process? Did I accomplish what it is that I set out to accomplish? Is this good enough?” When you can define what that 80% point is, you’ve got some criteria. Your criteria might be different. It might be in terms of how much costs you put into it, how much time was put into it. There are various different things that can go into your criteria and that should be your determining factor of whether or not it’s good enough.

Overworking isn't really adding value to the end result. Click To Tweet

The challenge is for you to take a look at everything that you’re doing and identify where you’re at the good enough point, “Is this good enough?” Identify the criteria. I want to remind that you have to do this before you start. It’s too easy once you get started, to listen to all your excuses about why you should keep going, why you should do one more thing. “I’ll just do this a little bit more.” Identify upfront what that criterion are so that you know when you’re at your 80% point and that you can stop there. I know it’s a challenge. I know you just want to go a little further, but really that last 20% of effort is not delivering the value. It’s not worth it. If you want to take back your time, then that’s where you’re going to get it back. It’s by not over functioning and overworking something that really isn’t any longer adding the value to the end result. That is a Take Back Time strategy. I’ll see you in the next episode.

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